Swimming really DOES enhance the learning of young children.

It has been a long time coming but thanks to Professor Robyn Jorgensen, Griffith Institute for Educational Research in Australia, The Kids Alive Swim Program and Swim Australia we now have the results of a four year study that determines that children that participate in early years swimming “achieve a wide range of skills earlier than the normal population”. We are not just talking a few weeks ahead as in some developmental areas children were 20 MONTHS ahead of their expected milestones!

Take a look at this Youtube video that outlines the findings of this amazing study that tested 7000 children aged 5 and under from Australia, New Zealand and the USA from different socio-economic backgrounds:

As you can see the results are even more surprising than what was first expected with not only physical expectations being exceeded but also amazing progression in the following areas:

• Visual Motor Skills
• Oral Expression
• Mathematics Reasoning
• Brief Reading
• Story Recall
• Understanding Directions

These skills are so valuable for young children especially for when they start in full time education and so it seems logical that the earlier you start babies swimming the more opportunity they have to be leaps and bounds ahead of their milestones by the time they reach the age of 5.

“Our research is categorical, evidence-based and shows that early years swimming has children well ahead in many of the skills and processes they will apply once at school” Professor Jorgensen

“The connection to education, to improved learning, is extremely exciting and significant” Professor Paul Mazerolle

You can find out more about Professor Jorgensen and her research at her website http://www.robynjorgensen.com.au/

SOURCE: “Swimming kids are smarter” from Griffith University, http://poc-app.griffith.edu.au/news/2012/11/15/swimming-kids-are-smarter/

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2 thoughts on “Swimming really DOES enhance the learning of young children.

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